An introduction to 4K Photography

When I was contacted and asked to become a Panasonic Lumix 4k Photo Ambassador I did two things: fist-pumped and then promptly googled ‘what is 4k photography?’  

4k photography is essentially grabbing stills from video. Those ‘blink and you’ll miss it’ moments which are hard to capture for the average person with and average camera and average know-how. 

The photos in this post are my first attempts at taking a 4k Photo. I decided to start off basic and capture an everyday moment to look closer at. Starting simple, to see what my new Lumix LX-100 camera can do and gain my confidence. And so I made a cup of coffee and dropped a sugar cube in it.

To take 4k photos on the Lumix LX-100 you record a video, the ones I shot were around the 10 seconds long mark (again, keeping things short and simple for my first goes). Then, using the playback button I watched my video back on the 3 inch LCD screen and paused it at the moment just before I anticipated movement, from this point I could jump forward (or backward) a frame at a time to see the stills taken. Honestly this part really impressed me, the details it picked up of the sugar cube hitting the coffee that happened so fast that I hadn’t noticed viewing in real time. Every frame you see you have the option to save that image as a still on your camera – this was a real moment of realization for me. You can pick the images you want from the video right there, right then, in the palm of your hand. No faffing about uploading video to a computer and taking stills from there. It was very simple and very intuitive on the Lumix LX-100.

You can then upload your photos from the memory card to your computer and edit your photos as usual.

Sugar cube dropping into coffee from Annie Spratt on Vimeo.

This sort of photography is great for capturing family shots, as I will be demonstrating next week. 4k photography can really help to capture those natural, un-staged moments of movement such as children running, jumping, splashing, throwing things. 

The bets thing about this is that you don’t need a DSLR mega-expensive camera to achieve this, the Lumix LX-100 that I used to capture these photos is around the Β£500-Β£599 mark, depending where you buy it.  I’ll post more about the camera itself next week so keep your eyes peeled or even better make sure you are subscribe by email or follow on Bloglovin.

Over the next few months I’ll be getting to know the Panasonic Lumix LX-100 and putting it through it’s paces with the theme of ‘Movement’. Think blowing glitter, spraying paint, smoke bombs, throwing confetti, party popper popping, jumping and capturing everyday family moments. I hope to have some lovely colourful moments if movement to share with you.

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