Wreath Making

Wreath Making

Wreath Making

Wreath Making
I stopped buying the national newpapers a couple of months back now  and just buy the local Free Press.  Not only has it stopped me from reading news I don’t want to read {and wasting a lot of my time}, but I don’t think I would have seen the advert for this class at Ruthin Craft Centre {and other kids workshops} anywhere else.  And I’ve come away with, I wouldn’t go as far as to say a new skill, but at least something I now know how to make. And will attempt again and again.

Further reading

Wreath making at Ruthin Craft Centre

Ruthin Craft Centre

The Craft Shed


Curated & Photogrpahed by

Cerys Lowe

Working from cafes - Me and Orla

Working from cafes via Me and Orla

This post from Sara is really interesting, the perspective. It's never crossed my mind not to work at home, or that I would be more productive working elsewhere. But now I think of it... Time to re-kindle the pie-in-the-sky idea of having a little studio office somewhere maybe?

So for three days a week, I get up early, I sit in unnecessary traffic burning uncessessary fuel, and work in one of a dozen or so nearby cafes. I visit different places on different days, depending on my mood, what work I have on, or the kind of ‘fix’ I need. Because cafes are a strange sort of self-medication, I’ve discovered – the scruffy student bar inspires different things to the shiny, on trend city-centre coffee shop. The different music & sounds & smells all trigger different responses in my brain, or something, and I find I’m much more able to immerse myself in whatever I need to create that day.
— meandorla.co.uk
 

 

I’m Breaking Up With A Simple Life

plant pot

I really enjoyed this post, shared by @kizzybassLCJ on Twitter recently. Slow living is something that I embraced more and more over the last year but the minimal aspect that seems integrated into it when people talk or one reads about it just doesn't 'fit' me. I like cozy clutter, lots of 'stuff' around me but I like living slowly. I guess it's a case of 'What's in a name?'  

Minimalism and the embracing of simple pleasures has permeated our current culture and I get it. I understand the rejection of mass consumption. I understand the need for minimalism and simplicity, to encourage others to question their consumptive habits. But, I find that too much of minimalism is paradoxically too much of a good thing.


I think it’s completely okay to want things, to chase after experiences beyond sitting in nature staring at a tree. For example, I think being in nature is wonderful, but it’s not going to satisfy a hunger for a Big Life. I love the idea of purging your possessions, but I don’t love the idea of shaming others because they want to experience physical success. Perhaps minimalism is a great ground zero to begin again from, but I am hesitant about staying there, about building a home in small desires.

Natural Christmas Wreath Inspiration

A natural Christmas Wreath
The base is dried clematis branches from the garden, twisted around each other and then tied in a couple of places with twine to keep it together. The clematis branches are tough as old boots and tend to not snap, so they are a good one to use and you can add more and more to get the thickness you need. I like mine this size though as it allows the flowers to take centre stage. Here I've used eucalyptus which I adore the scent of, then used a few heads from eryngium tucked through the gaps in the clematis branches and finally one large head of dill.

Further reading

A Natural Christmas Wreath

A natural midwinter Pinterest board

How to make your own natural Christmas decorations


Curated & Photographed by

Jen Chillingsworth

Upcyled Bird Feeder

img.jpg

Old dustpan given a new life as a bird 'table'.

Further reading

Upcycled Bird Feeders on Pinterest

RSPB


Curated and photographed by

Emma Cavill

Having spent 10 years working in the corporate world, and living in a busy city centre, Emma now loves life back in the beautiful West Country, where she and her husband set up Somerset Yurts and run a dairy farm on her Husband's family farm set in the Quantock Hills AONB

She has bit of an obsession for all things photographic, whether it's 

Website

Instagram

Pinterest

Twitter

Hazelnuts

These wonderful nuts are all about slow living to me. Finding them, picking them, preparing them, and then cracking open their shells for snacking on - perfection. Mind you - don't hang about too long, or the Squirrels will beat you to them!

 

Curated and photographed by

Emma Cavill

Having spent 10 years working in the corporate world, and living in a busy city centre, Emma now loves life back in the beautiful West Country, where she and her husband set up Somerset Yurts and run a dairy farm on her Husband's family farm set in the Quantock Hills AONB

She has bit of an obsession for all things photographic, whether it's photographing her children, puppy, garden, farm, yurts... or just finding the beauty in simple everyday things.

Website

Instagram

Pinterest

Twitter

Dreams of a life lived simply

“I live alone,

with cats, books, pictures, fresh vegetables to cook, the garden, the hens to feed.”

— Jeanette Winterson

 

“I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,

And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:

Nine bean-rows I will have there, a hive for the honey-bee;

And live alone in the bee-loud glade.”

— W.B. Yeats

 

Curated and photographed by

Sarah Hardman

Sarah lives over at Mitenska, where she chronicles life's simple pleasures.

She's a keen photographer, writer and tea drinker. Her favourite things include collecting treasures from her daily rambles, baking cake, rainy days and cosying up with a good book.

She resides in the Pennines with her partner and little boy.

Website

Pinterest

Tumblr

Twitter

The poetry of colour

It's a beautiful time of year to go out and explore. September into October: leaves turning (and falling), gourds and squashes, apples, blackberries, woodsmoke.

It's also a perfect time to consider colour. Looking at this list you realise colour has a poetry all of it's own.

Obscure colour words

albicant: whitish; becoming white

amaranthine: immortal; undying; deep purple-red colour

aubergine: eggplant; a dark purple colour

azure: light or sky blue; the heraldic colour blue

celadon: pale green; pale green glazed pottery

cerulean: sky-blue; dark blue; sea-green

chartreuse: yellow-green colour

cinnabar: red crystalline mercuric sulfide pigment; deep red or scarlet colour

citrine: dark greenish-yellow

eburnean: of or like ivory; ivory-coloured

erythraean: reddish colour

flavescent: yellowish or turning yellow

greige: of a grey-beige colour

haematic: blood coloured

heliotrope: purplish hue; purplish-flowered plant; ancient sundial; signalling mirror

hoary: pale silver-grey colour; grey with age

isabelline: greyish yellow

jacinthe: orange colour

kermes: brilliant red colour; a red dye derived from insects

lovat: grey-green; blue-green

madder: red dye made from brazil wood; a reddish or red-orange colour

mauve: light bluish purple

mazarine: rich blue or reddish-blue colour

russet: reddish brown

This particular list appears in various guises all over Tumblr. It's interesting to look at and to identify the hues you think best describe what you see. So much more inspiring than plain old 'green', 'orange', 'cream' or 'purple'... 

I've made a 'colour' board on Pinterest and it's immediately apparent which colours I'm drawn to: sea and acid greens, heather purples, turquoise.  It's a good exercise if you're planning a new knitting project or maybe considering re-painting your front door...

 

Curated and photographed by

Sarah Hardman

Sarah lives over at Mitenska, where she chronicles life's simple pleasures.

She's a keen photographer, writer and tea drinker. Her favourite things include collecting treasures from her daily rambles, baking cake, rainy days and cosying up with a good book.

She resides in the Pennines with her partner and little boy.

Website

Pinterest

Tumblr

Twitter

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Self Sufficiency - Chickens


Curated and photographed by

Emma Cavill

Having spent 10 years working in the corporate world, and living in a busy city centre, Emma now loves life back in the beautiful West Country, where she and her husband set up Somerset Yurts and run a dairy farm on her Husband's family farm set in the Quantock Hills AONB

She has bit of an obsession for all things photographic, whether it's photographing her children, puppy, garden, farm, yurts... or just finding the beauty in simple everyday things.

website

instagram

pinterest

twitter

Gardens, glimpsed

Gardens, glimpsed

Over a wall...

Gardens, glimpsed

Or beyond a gate...

Gardens, glimpsed

Sometimes we can become lost in a garden by simply glimpsing it from the outside.

Gardens, glimpsed

'Perhaps it was because she had nothing whatever to do that she thought so much of the desired garden. She was curious about it, and wanted to see what it was like.'

"Everything is made out of magic, leaves and trees, flowers and birds, badgers and foxes and squirrels and people. So it must be all around us. In this garden - in all the places.” 

Further reading

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett


Curated and photographed by

Sarah Hardman

Sarah lives over at Mitenska, where she chronicles life's simple pleasures.

She's a keen photographer, writer and tea drinker. Her favourite things include collecting treasures from her daily rambles, baking cake, rainy days and cosying up with a good book.

She resides in the Pennines with her partner and little boy.

website

pinterest

Tumblr

Twitter

Wander and Gather

Wander and Gather: a place for precious things, 'beautiful things'. Foraged and kept or found, but wouldn't dream of taking; a precious flower or a birds nest. Created by Nina Nixon. Join in on Instagram #wanderandgather. Follow Nina

 
 

Curated and photographed by

Gemma M

City Dweller. Country Soul

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No-sew cushion covers

Vintage scarves into cushion covers. A few folds, a knot or two... 

Done!

No need to cut into your precious vintage finds but a lovely way to display them.

 
 

Curated by

Sarah Hardman

Sarah lives over at Mitenska, where she chronicles life's simple pleasures.

She's a keen photographer, writer and tea drinker. Her favourite things include collecting treasures from her daily rambles, baking cake, rainy days and cosying up with a good book.

website

pinterest

tumblr

twitter